Exploring medication error causality and reporting in Hamad Medical Corporation

Exploring medication error causality and reporting in Hamad Medical Corporation
The aim of this study was to explore causes of medication errors and their reporting within Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) from the perspectives of health professionals and other key stakeholders such as policy makers and leaders.
A study of the attitudes, beliefs and experiences of health professionals and other key stakeholders
Funding Body
Award Value
Start Date
End Date
Duration
Funding Body
Qatar National Research Fund
Award Value
US $600 000
Start Date
July 2015
End Date
June 2017
Duration
2 years
Methodology

The first study focused on the health professionals and causes of errors. We sent a questionnaire to all health professionals (doctors, nurses and pharmacists) working in HMC based on aspects of patient safety culture. Some also took part in focus group discussions. Lastly, key people in Qatar including health policy makers, professional leaders and managers, lead educators and trainers were interviewed.

Conclusions of Results

For health professionals, there were major issues around how they felt and were treated by their managers and co-workers if they made an error with many feeling that they were punished. They also felt that there were staff shortages at times such as evenings and weekends. Communication could be more open at all levels of HMC. The main reasons for not reporting were due to fear and being worried with concerns about careers and reputations. There were instances of never hearing feedback.

 The interviews with the policy makers and leaders added to the results of the health professionals. These individuals appeared to be highly committed to promoting patient safety. They were very aware of the need to promote trust within the organisation by making individuals feel that they would not always be blamed for their errors. They also felt that more could be done so that all workers felt equal and that some were not more important than others. They were also aware that medication error reporting was not working as well as it could be and that there was an opportunity for improvement.