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Natalie Campbell, Forensic and Analytical Science

Natalie Campbell
Taking on a broad range of experiences to gain sought after transferable skills, an Aberdeen-based Forensic and Analytical Science student graduated from Robert Gordon University (RGU) on Thursday 11 July.

Natalie Campbell (20) took to the stage in His Majesty's Theatre in front of family and friends to collect her BSc (Hons) in Forensic and Analytical Science.

“I am highly delighted with my result and couldn’t have hoped for more out of my course. Having taken on the challenge one year earlier than most of my peers, I wanted to make sure it was worth the risk of leaving a year early from school.

“My time at RGU was exciting. From being part of RGU cheerleading and competing nationally to being a student ambassador representing the university at different events, I was provided with lots of learning opportunities.”

Natalie left school for university at 16, having achieved the entry qualifications she was looking for at Higher level in one sitting. RGU’s Forensic and Analytical Science course was exactly what she was looking for.

“I learn best through practical work and the course was very hands on,” said Natalie. “The best part was being able to feel like you were actually working a case, from entering a crime scene in full white suit, mask, goggles, gloves and shoe covers, to collecting and analysing the evidence, to presenting an expert witness report in front of a mock jury and judges.

“I was able to get a feel for all aspects of the forensic process. We were also taught the analytical side and the background behind multiple instruments used to analyse and build a report for presentation in a court. I now have multiple transferable skills which can be used in any workplace.”

Through the project choices available to her, Natalie was able to participate in research into antioxidants and their effect on Alzheimer’s.

“I was happy to learn that the research I carried out will be continued by a PhD student,” adds Natalie. “It’s nice to know that the hard work you put in may positively influence someone’s life in the future.”

The Employability and Professional Enrichment Hub at RGU supported Natalie with extra experience, which she was keen to take advantage of.

Natalie said: “It was through the hub that I found out about the BP tutor scheme, where I helped out in a classroom environment for three months and learned to appreciate the hard work of teaching and academic staff.

“I was also put forward for graduate outcomes enquiries, which ended up being a part-time job and a way of building my confidence and professional communication skills.”

Natalie saw university life as an opportunity to push herself out of her comfort zone, take on new challenges and meet new people.

“I was part of RGU’s cheerleading squad for two years, where I learned a lot about teamwork and made new friends from different degree disciplines,” said Natalie. “It was a great for managing exam stress and allowed me to have a social life and get fit while doing so.

“I also became a student ambassador and worked with international students, one of which I will be visiting at the beginning of my travels in Singapore. I would never have met her had it not been for the work experience I was given through RGU.”

Taking a year out to travel and experience the world, Natalie will be exploring Australia, Thailand and New Zealand.

Natalie adds: “When I get back, I hope to pursue a career in science-based professional recruitment or medical sales. RGU has provided me with multiple opportunities, both extracurricular and through my degree, which have given me many skills I can apply to multiple job disciplines.”

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