Profile

Colin Thompsom
Title: Dr
First Name: Colin
Surname: Thompson
Position: Lecturer
Telephone: +44 (0) 1224 262561
Email:
ORCID: ORCID Icon http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9571-9434

Dr Thompson is a lecturer in Surface Chemistry and Drug Delivery and Research Degrees Coordinator at the School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences. His research interests lie in the areas of polymer-drug conjugates, Drug micro- and nano-encapsulation, Polyelectrolyte delivery systems and Oral protein delivery.

Duties and Responsibilities

  • Lecturer in Surface Chemistry and Drug Delivery at the School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences
  • Research Degrees Coordinator at the School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences

Academic Background

  • MPharm (Hons) 1st Class, RGU 2002
  • PhD in Pharmaceutics, RGU 2007

Dr Thompson has been an undergraduate, postgraduate and research fellow within the School and a lecturer in Pharmaceutical Science since July 2009. He is also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a Member of the Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Research Interests

Dr Thompson's research interests include:

  • Polymer-drug conjugates
  • Drug micro- and nano-encapsulation
  • Polyelectrolyte delivery systems
  • Oral protein delivery

Publications

Key Publications (Present - 2008)

  1. Ibie, C. O., Thompson, C. J. and Knott, R., 2015. Synthesis, characterisation and in vitro evaluation of novel thiolated derivatives of polyallylamine and quaternised polyallylamine. Colloid and Polymer Science 293(6), 1737-1748.
  2. Ibie, C. O., Knott, R. and Thompson, C. J., 2015. In-vitro evaluation of the effect of polymer structure on uptake of novel polymer-insulin polyelectrolyte complexes by human epithelial cells. International Journal of Pharmaceutics 479, 103-117.
  3. Thompson, C. J. and Ibie, C. O., 2011. The oral delivery of proteins using interpolymer polyelectrolyte complexes. Therapeutic Delivery 2(12), 1611-1631.
  4. Chemically Modified Polyelectrolytes for Intestinal Peptide and Protein Delivery, by C. Thompson and W. P. Cheng. In: Peptide and Protein Delivery, C Van der Walle (Ed.). Elsevier: London, 2011.
  5. Thompson C. J., Cheng W. P., Gadad P., Skene K., Smith M., Smith G., McKinnon A., Knott R., 2011. Uptake and Transport of Novel Amphiphilic Polyelectrolyte-Insulin Nanocomplexes by Caco-2 Cells-Towards Oral Insulin. Pharmaceutical Research, 28(4), 886-896.
  6. Cheng, W. P., Thompson, C., Ryan, S. M., Aguirre, T., Tetley, L. and Brayden, D. J., 2010. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of a novel peptide delivery system: Amphiphilic polyelectrolyte-salmon calcitonin nanocomplexes. Journal of Controlled Release 147(2), 289-297.
  7. Thompson, C. J., Tetley, L. and Cheng, W.P., 2010. The influence of polymer architecture on the protective effect of novel comb shaped amphiphilic poly(allylamine) against in vitro enzymatic degradation of insulin:Towards oral insulin delivery. International Journal of Pharmaceutics 383, 216-227.
  8. Thompson, C. J., Tetley, L. and Cheng, W.P., 2009. The influence of polymer architecture on the protective effect of novel comb shaped amphiphilic poly(allylamine) against in vitro enzymatic degradation of insulin towards oral insulin delivery. International Journal of Pharmaceutics 376, 46–55.
  9. Thompson, C. J., Uchegbu, I. F., Tetley, L. and Cheng, W.P., 2009. The use of novel combed shaped amphiphilic polymers for oral delivery of insulin. International Journal of Pharmaceutics 376 (1-2), 46-55.
  10. Thompson, C.J., Hansford, D., Higgins, S., Rostron, C., Hutcheon, G.A. and Munday, D.L., 2009. Preparation and evaluation of microspheres prepared from novel polyester-ibuprofen conjugates blended with non-conjugated ibuprofen. Journal of Microencapsulation 26(8), 676-683.
  11. Thompson, C. J., Ding, C. X., Qu, X. Z., Yang, Z. Z., Uchegbu, I. F., Tetley, L. and Cheng, W.P., 2008. The effect of polymer architecture on the nano self-assemblies based on novel comb-shaped amphiphilic poly(allylamine). Colloid and Polymer Science 286(13), 1511-1526.
  12. Thompson, C.J., Hansford, D., Higgins, S., Rostron, C., Hutcheon, G.A. and Munday, D.L., 2008. Synthesis and evaluation of novel polyester-ibuprofen  conjugates for modified drug release. Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy  34(8), 877-884.

Teaching

Dr. Thompson teaches a variety of undergraduate modules across all four years on the MPharm course. He also the module coordinator for both Project modules on the MPharm.

Potential PhD Titles

  • Design and evaluation of amphiphilic drug-polymer conjugates.

    Amphiphilic polymers self-assemble inaqueous solution to form nano-sized particles. These particles can be used to deliver drugs to specific tissues based on their size and covalently attached targeting ligands. These have principally been developed for use in chemotherapy, but could be used to deliver drugs for other conditions. Drugs can either be physically loaded into these particles or covalently attached.The choice of covalent linker can increase the specificity of the drug delivery, by being cleaved under certain environmental conditions only found at the target site. This project would involve the design, synthesis and characterisation of a range of polymers. The characterisation of these polymers would involve a range of techniques including, NMR and IR. Drug loading and release as well as cell culture evaluation (on appropriate model cell lines) would also be carried out to determine the optimal polymer structure to deliver each drug used.
  • Use of polyelectrolyte complexes for drug delivery:

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) are produced by mixing solutions of oppositely charged polymers. PECs have more desirable properties than each individual polymer, i.e. tensile strength and mucoadhesion, and are used to produce delivery systems for drugs via a number of routes, e.g. oral, buccal, and nasal. The versatility of these complexes allows them to be used to deliver a variety of drugs for many different conditions, e.g. ulcerative colitis, hypertension. This project would involve the selection of a range of oppositely charged polymers to produce PECs. The student would also have input into the choice of delivery route, drug and dosage form to be produced. The PECs would be analysed to determine their mechanical, as well as mucoadhesive, properties. A range of drugs would be formulated using these PECs into appropriate dosage forms for the delivery route. Each dosage form will be characterised by a variety of techniques, e.g.drug release, texture analysis, and cell culture evaluation, in order to determine the optimal PEC for the chosen drug.