Profile

Title: Dr
First Name: Gemma
Surname: Stevens
Position: Lecturer
Telephone: 01224 263231
Email:

Academic Background

  • BA Hons
  • PhD

Teaching

  • Introductory Psychology – Year 1
  • Qualitative Research Methods – Year 1
  • Social Psychology – Year 4
  • Social Psychology – Applied Psychology MSc
  • Understanding Psychology as a Science 1 – Applied Psychology MSc
  • Development, Behaviour and Interpersonal Processes – Social Work MSc

Administration / Service

  • Year 1 Tutor (Applied Social Sciences degree programme)
  • Advanced-Entry Tutor (Applied Social Sciences degree programme)
  • Personal Tutor
  • BA (Hons) Dissertation Supervisor
  • Module Co-ordinator (Social Psychology, Year 4, Social Psychology, MSc)

Professional Background

Gemma is a psychologist, whose research focus is within the area of Health Psychology. Her research explores the role of informal, everyday learning on the day-to-day psychosocial experience of chronic illness. She is particularly interested in the use of social media in the illness experience, and its impact on patients’ coping and self-management. More recently, Gemma has been involved in research exploring the physical activity and dietary patterns of adolescents with intellectual disabilities. Gemma joined RGU in September 2016, having graduated with a PhD from the University of the West of Scotland in July 2016. Prior to joining RGU, she worked as a Research Assistant at the University of Strathclyde, within the department of Physical Activity for Health. During her PhD, Gemma worked as an Associate Lecturer at the University of the West of Scotland.

Research Interests

  • The illness experience
  • The impacts of learning in illness
  • Illness identity
  • Illness transitions
  • Determinants of physical activity in intellectual disability population
  • Learning theory
  • Communities of Practice

Publications

Stevens, G., O’Donnell, V.L., & Williams, L. (2015). Public domain or private data? Developing an ethical approach to social media research in an inter-disciplinary project. Educational Research and Evaluation. 21(2), 154-167.

O’Donnell, V.L., Kean, M., & Stevens, G. (2016). Student transitions in higher education: concepts, theories and practices. Higher Education Academy. https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/system/files/downloads/student_transition_in_higher_education.pdf

Stevens, G., Jahoda, A., Matthews L., Hankey, C., Melville, C., Murray, H., & Mitchell, F. Social and environmental determinants of physical activity and dietary choices in young adults with intellectual disabilities in their final year of school. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities (under review).

Stevens, G., O’Donnell, V.L., & Williams, L. The impact of learning in cyberspace on chronic illness: information sharing and (dis)trust. Patient Education and Counselling (under review).

Conferences

Stevens, G., O’Donnell, V.L., & Williams, L. (2016, August). “Gaun Yersel’”: The impact of learning within a self-management patient education programme. Poster presentation at the European Health Psychology and British Psychological Society Division of Health Psychology conference, Aberdeen.

Stevens, G., Mitchell, F., Jahoda, A., Matthews, L., Hankey, C., Murray, H., & Melvill, C. (2016, June). Determinants of physical activity and dietary choices in adolescents with intellectual disability: a feasibility study. Poster presentation at the International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, Cape Town.

Stevens, G., O’Donnell, V. L., & Williams, L. (2015, September). The impact of learning on patients in chronic illness support groups: transitions, health literacy and coping. Oral presentation at the Division of Health Psychology conference for the British Psychological Society, London.

Stevens, G., O’Donnell, V. L., & Williams, L. (2014, September). The impact of learning in cyberspace on chronic illness: identity, coping and the psychosocial experience. Poster presented at the Division of Health Psychology conference for the British Psychological Society, York.